Autodesk Senior Vice President tells it like it is

I didn’t expect to see any comment about the policy of denying bug fixes to some customers from any Autodesk high-ups, but I was mistaken.

Here’s a quote on just this subject from Autodesk Senior Vice President1, Buzz Kross:

It’s just bad business. Why would you not want to take care of your customers? I would never do that. Come on, we all make mistakes. All software has bugs and as a developer, I have an obligation to provide fixes to all my paying customers, whether they are on subscription or not. Customers on subscription have the advantage of getting access to new stuff. That’s fine. But denying them access to bug fixes is just not right.

Buzz Kross, Senior Vice President, Autodesk1
9 April 2010


Photo: Autodesk

It’s not often I so completely agree with an Autodesk executive1, but I can find no fault in his logic. Thank you, Buzz.


1. Although Buzz is still listed as a SVP in some Autodesk online materials, he’s no longer with the company.

Autodesk confirms its own unconscionable conduct

It took several attempts over a period of months and was like pulling teeth, but Autodesk has now confirmed that it is deliberately withholding bug fixes from some of its customers. Autodesk has taken customers’ money and in return has provided defective software (OK, that happens). It has fixed some of those defects (that happens too, sometimes). But it’s limiting distribution of those fixes to those prepared to pay Autodesk further (that has never happened before). Just let that sink in. Autodesk broke stuff you paid for, could easily fix it, but won’t do so unless you pay more. If …

What’s changed at blog nauseam and why

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Automated .NET 4.7 update kills AutoCAD pre 2017

Thanks to Robert Green for pointing this out: Microsoft is installing .NET 4.7 as part of their auto updates and it is causing many legacy Autodesk applications to crash on any ribbon interaction. Touch the ribbon, away goes your software. If you can keep from installing the 4.7 framework do so. If the damage is already done then uninstall .NET 4.7 and install .NET 4.6.2 using this download link. Note that the uninstall of the offending version must be done first! AutoCAD 2013 to 2016 and Inventor are affected, and possibly other products. BricsCAD users are unaffected. It is also …

AutoCAD 2018.0.2 arrives

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AutoCAD 2018.0.1 mystery deepens with silent withdrawal

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Autodesk updates Design Review

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AutoCAD 2018.0.1 mystery partially resolved but questions remain

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AutoCAD 2018 – there’s already an update

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AutoCAD 2017.1.1 Update

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BricsCAD startup LISP bug fixed

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I have a real problem with BricsCAD

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Magical disappearing AutoCAD 2017.1 crash information

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Dear Autodesk Recap 360 team…

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How to break Civil 3D 2013

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